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What Is The Process Of Bringing Your Spouse To Live In The US As A Permanent Resident?

If you wish to bring your spouse (husband/wife) to live in the United States as a green card holder, you must be either a U.S. citizen yourself or a green card holder i.e. you must have completed the U.S immigration process to become a lawful permanent resident of the States with all the benefits for life. The life partners of U.S. green card holders are qualified for migration under the family second preference classification (2A). This is valid for both same-sex and inverse sex couples, as long as the marriage is legitimately perceived in the state/nation where it occurred. The… Read More

WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES OF OVERSTAYING A U.S. VISA?

When you enter the United States with a temporary, non-immigrant visa, it is important to know just how long you are allowed to stay in the country. Although your visa will have an expiration date, this is not necessarily indicative of how long you will be allowed to reside in the country. A visa simply allows you to travel from your native country to a port of entry in the United States. If you are allowed to enter, you will receive a second card, Form 1-94, which will determine when you must leave the U.S. If you stay past the… Read More

CAN I TRAVEL OUTSIDE OF THE U.S. WITH A GREEN CARD?

TRAVELING INTERNATIONALLY AS A PERMANENT RESIDENT If you are a green card holder and permanent resident of the United States, you are free to travel outside of the country—whether you want to take a vacation or visit friends and family in your native country. A brief trip abroad will not affect your permanent resident status; however, it is important to understand what is required to exit and re-enter the country before leaving the United States. DOCUMENTS YOU WILL NEED TO EXIT & RE-ENTER THE U.S. When traveling outside of the U.S. as a green card holder, you will be required… Read More

HOW DO I BRING MY CHILD TO THE UNITED STATES?

HOW CHILDREN, SONS & DAUGHTERS ARE DEFINED IN IMMIGRATION CASES If you are a citizen of the United States or a permanent resident (i.e. green card holder), you can file a petition with the U.S. government to bring your child into the country. In a family-based immigration petition, a “child” is defined as being under the age of 21 and unmarried. If your child is over the age of 21 and/or married, they would be defined as either a “son” or “daughter” on your petition. OVERVIEW OF THE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS According to the eligibility requirements laid out by the U.S.… Read More

HOW CRIMINAL CHARGES CAN AFFECT YOUR IMMIGRATION STATUS

CHARGED WITH A CRIME? DON’T WAIT – CALL OUR FIRM TODAY! If you have been charged with a crime, your immigrant status could be at risk—whether you are a lawful permanent resident of the United States or you have been granted temporary residency through a green card. Criminal charges can create significant complications for immigrants, which is why you should contact an immigration attorney in Orlando, FL immediately if you have been accused of a crime. The Fisher Legal Group can put decades of legal experience to work for you. Contact our office today to take advantage of a free, no-obligation… Read More